Capon Bridge Founders Day Festival

 

Free Admission
Free Shuttle to Parking
Please No Pets

 

2017 Vendor Application

 
 
 

 

Friday, September 22, Saturday, September 23 and Sunday September 24, 2017

Open File
History Presentations
 
Saturday, September 23, 2017

10:30   Dave Zaladonis, Flintlock Muzzleloader and the Frontier
11:00   Ashley Creek, Chickasaw Story Telling
12:30   Sheila Hansen, Shawnee Elder, History & Life of Native Communities
  2:00   Doug Riley as Stonewall Jackson
  3:15   Jeanne Zaladonis, Music on the Frontier
  4:15   Jim Morris, Stringed Instrument Making
  4:45   Rob Wolford, Census of Manufacturers of Hampshire County 1820 & 1850
 
Sunday, September 24, 2017
 
09:30   Divine Service in Stonewall Jackson tent
11:00   Doug Riley as Stonewall Jackson
11:00   Ashley Creek, Native Chickasaw Story Telling
12:30   Sheila Hansen, History & Life of Native Communities
  1:30   Sherryrobin Boland, Herebal Folklore, Medicine & Magic
  2:45   Charles Boland, Period Furniture Making
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
Saturday, September 23, 2017

10:30 Dave Zaladonis*

Inspired by the Daniel Boone and Davy Crocket RV shows, Mr. Zaladonis
took an interest in 18th century flintlock hunting beginning in the
1980s.  Currently he hunts in 18th century clothing and uses only a
flintlock or smoothbore muzzleloader.  This talk will cover the life
experiences of a ranger and frontiersman during the French & Indian
War period (1755-1763) including the loading and firing of the flintlock
muzzleloader and its use on the Frontier.
 
11:00 Ashley Creek*

Ms. Creek is a Chickasaw native.  She works at the Shanandoah Discovery Museum in Winchester, VA, where she spends much of her time in the exhibit for the Eastern Woodlands called Moccasin Trail.  She oversees the information given on indigenous prople to be sure it is factual, appropriate, doesn't gloss over anything and meets learning standards.  Her stories are authentic glimpses of indigenous community life.
12:30               Sheila Hansen*

Ms. Hanson is a Shawnee Elder.  She describes herself as an activist when it comes to sacred places and people.  Her goal is to keep knowledge of native communities alive and connect with
all people so that those who trace their roots to native communities can gain knowledge.  She will share information about the life in native communities by facilitating discussion and activities that illuminate knowledge and history of native people. 
 
2:00  Doug Riley as Stonewall Jackson*

Born in Clarksburg, Jackson was an orphan who became one of the most revered names in military history. He is regarded by experts as a tactical genius and a relentless battlefield commander of unsurpassed ability. The men of the “Stonewall Brigade” were fiercely loyal to their leader. General Jackson was a devoutly religious man whose death by friendly fire was a crushing blow to Confederate hopes for ultimate victory.
 Lt. General Jackson's participation is sponsored by the History Alive! Program of the West Virginia Humanities Council
with additional financial assistance from the Office of the Secretary, West Virginia Department of Education and the Arts. 
 
3:15        Jeanne Zaladonis*
Jeanne portrays a wife who sometimes travels with the military ranger
unit.  In addition to mending, laundry, cooking, and other camp shores,
she enjoys playing Celtic and other old tunes on her fiddle.  Her talk will cover the development and use of music during the time of the French and Indian War.
 

4:15        Jim Morris*
 

After retiring from a government job in Wash., DC, Mr. Morris started playing guitar in various venues in the Metopolitan area. During this time he was also a crew member and sound man for the comedy troupe "The Capitol Steps". He and his wife moved to Hampshire Co. WV about 10 years ago. It was here that he was exposed to old time fiddle and banjo music. He researched the banjo and the banjo’s history in the United States including the many different methods and materials used in making them.  Now he makes a variety of other instruments, but focuses on the banjo.  He will discuss methods folks would have used in the making of stringed instruments in a pre-industrial situation using only what materials were at hand.
 

4:45        Rob Wolford*
 
Mr. Wolford grew up in Romney and Augusta, WV, listening to stories of his family’s rich heritage in Hampshire County; He represents the 7th generation of Wolfords to have lived in Hampshire County, his son is the 8th.  He served in the US Army 6 years before going to college using his GI Bill.  He graduated Cum Laude from Shepherd College and then earned a Masters of History from California University of Pennsylvania.  He currently teaches West Virginia Studies at Romney Middle School and enjoys demonstrating frontier and ante-bellum occupations and craftsmanship. He is the Historian for the Town of Romney and serves as the Romney Town Crier. He is also a contributor to the Hampshire Review and writes on Civil War and early 20th Century subjects. His passion is all things Hampshire County. 
Mr. Wolford will discuss the census of Manufacturers of Hampshire County 1820 and 1850.
 

Sunday, September 24, 2017
 

9:30 Divine Service 
 
 General Thomas J. Jackson, Commander of 2nd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, Invites all Saints and Sinners to join him at his tent, Sunday September 24th, for Divine Services.  Services will Start Promptly at 9:30am.  Prayers and Supplications to Our Kind Heavenly Father, with Hymns of Praise will be offered.  The General will share with the worshipers the text of, 2nd Corinthians 5:1-9, which he shared with his wife the morning he departed for this great and terrible war for our Second Independence.  The services will conclude prior to 10:00am, because of the pressing activities of the day.


11:00   Doug Riley as Stonewall Jackson
 

Born in Clarksburg, Jackson was an orphan who became one of the most revered names in military history. He is regarded by experts as a tactical genius and a relentless battlefield commander of unsurpassed ability. The men of the “Stonewall Brigade” were fiercely loyal to their leader. General Jackson was a devoutly religious man whose death by friendly fire was a crushing blow to Confederate hopes for ultimate victory.
 Lt. General Jackson's participation is sponsored by the History Alive! Program of the West Virginia Humanities Council
with additional financial assistance from the Office of the Secretary, West Virginia Department of Education and the Arts. 
 


 

 
Saturday
11:00 Ashley Creek*

Ms. Creek is a Chickasaw native.  She works at the Shanandoah Discovery Museum in Winchester, VA, where she spends much of her time in the exhibit for the Eastern Woodlands called Moccasin Trail.  She oversees the information given on indigenous prople to be sure it is factual, appropriate, doesn't gloss over anything and meets learning standards.  Her stories are authentic glimpses of indigenous community life.
12:15 Sheila Hanson*


Ms. Hanson is a Shawnee Elder.  She describes herself as an activist when it comes to sacred places and people.  Her goal is to keep knowledge of native communities alive and connect with
all people so that those who trace their roots to native communities can gain knowledge.  She will share information about the life in native communities by facilitating discussion and activities that illuminate knowledge and history of native people.

2:00 Sherryrobin Boland
 
Ms. Boland is a West Virginia Master Gardener, grows and studies 18th century herbs, and has a background in herbal medicine and preparations, 18th century herbal garden design and function.  She will discuss Appalachian folklore, medicine, and superstitution handed down from our ancestors including how herbs were used by the "Granny Woman" in West Virginia and surrounding areas for healing, telling stories and creating a bit of magic.  She will answer the following:  What herbs did they use?  Where did they come from?


 

2:45 Charles Boland
 
Mr. Boland is an 18th century Traditional Windsor Chair Maker & Joiner with Studies in Tradition furniture making at:  the Windsor Institute Hampton NH with Michael Dunbar, The Woodwrights school, Pittboro, NC with Roy Underhill, Mary May and Bill Anderson, Country workshops, NC with Peter Follansbee, head joiner Plymouth Plantation.  Since 2004 he has been recognized as one of the top 200 listed in the "Directory of Traditional American Crafts," Early American Magazine.  Categories in which he has been selected include Windsor Furniture, Formal or Painted Furniture and Miscellaneous.  Mr. Boland will talk about the techniques and methods used in making 18th century furniture including the history of some of the period furniture and their makers.
West Virginia Humanities Council

*These speakers are presented with financial assistance from the West Virginia Humanities Council, a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.  Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations do not necessarily represent those of the West Virginia Humanities Council or the National Endowment for the Humanities.